Landscapes and the Route: Highway Approaching Viana, Navarra, September 2011.
Soon after Viana the Camino Francés crosses the Rio Ebro and enters La Rioja though that region’s capital Logroño. Spain’s housing boom before the 2008 bust led to many vineyard areas at the ends of towns in the Ebro Valley, including Viana, being converted to housing estates. Too bad since some of Navarra (and Spain’s) best wines came from those vineyards.

Landscapes and the Route: Highway Approaching Viana, Navarra, September 2011.

Soon after Viana the Camino Francés crosses the Rio Ebro and enters La Rioja though that region’s capital Logroño. Spain’s housing boom before the 2008 bust led to many vineyard areas at the ends of towns in the Ebro Valley, including Viana, being converted to housing estates. Too bad since some of Navarra (and Spain’s) best wines came from those vineyards.

Towns: O Cebreiro, Looking Toward Church From Albergue, Rainy October Day, 2001.
Cebreiro was one of the early villages to benefit from the Camino, fitting since its pastor Padrias Elias Valiña san Pedro and his flock were  responsible for remarking the route and making the Camino walkable once again.
At the top of a long and steep climb, most peregrinos opt to spend the night in el Cebreiro, and the elevation often means chilly and wet weather (2 of three times for me). This has encouraged bars, several of which have rooms to let, and even a small industry dependent on passenger pilgrims, those who visit by bus. A consequence has been the improvement of the streets and the buildings, including some of the distinctive pallozas with thatch roofing.

Towns: O Cebreiro, Looking Toward Church From Albergue, Rainy October Day, 2001.

Cebreiro was one of the early villages to benefit from the Camino, fitting since its pastor Padrias Elias Valiña san Pedro and his flock were  responsible for remarking the route and making the Camino walkable once again.

At the top of a long and steep climb, most peregrinos opt to spend the night in el Cebreiro, and the elevation often means chilly and wet weather (2 of three times for me). This has encouraged bars, several of which have rooms to let, and even a small industry dependent on passenger pilgrims, those who visit by bus. A consequence has been the improvement of the streets and the buildings, including some of the distinctive pallozas with thatch roofing.